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Metallurgy & Materials Science

Introduce information resources for Metallurgy and Materials Science to Mines community.

Why citing sources

Citing sources is the hallmark of professional and scholarly communication. As a scientist or engineer, you communicate how you built your work and reached your conclusions. By citing sources, you:

  • Lend validity to your own research approach
  • Link your conclusion/contribution/idea to its context
  • Give the original creator credit
  • Permit your reader to verify your claims and pursue more information

Citing sources encourages you to think. By documenting how others' ideas connect to yours, you get the concepts more firmly in your head. Anything else is cheating yourself on your education.

Plagiarism is bad. Whether you content-scrape, buy another's paper, or just don't keep track of what you're doing, it's a breach of professional ethics if intentional, and also a sign of incompetence if unintentional. Either way, be aware of what constitutes plagiarism, and don't do it.

Citation Styles in Metallurge and Materials Science

Follow citations styles in Chemistry or Engineering, depending on the publication you submit manuscript to.  

Chemistry

American Chemical Society (ACS) Style

Engineering

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recommend Chicago Manual of Style

Access to Citation Management Software

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