Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Mines Museum of Earth Science, Digital Collections: Minerals of Creede, Colorado

MInerals of Creede, Colorado

Minerals of Creede, Colorado showcases the Geology Museum's collections of specimens from the Creede District, one of Colorado's most distinctive mining districts. To see the full collection, visit Minerals of Creede, Colorado, in Mines Geology Museum's digital Mineral Specimens community, Digital Collections of Colorado.

Located in the San Juan Mountains, the Creede District in Mineral County is in the Outer Zone of the Colorado Mineral Belt (COMB). Discovered in 1899, it is the last of the state's great silver bonanzas.

 

 

See Minerals of Creede, Colorado (full collection)

Examples of Specimens in this Collection

Barite with micropyromorphite crystals

Barite with micropyromorphite crystals

Intergrowth of colorless blades of barite with a few scattered microcrystals of pyromorphite. Mineral specimen is from Bulldog mine, Bulldog vein, Creede mining district, Colorado. Raines, Ed. Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum.

Silver

Silver

Branching arborescent growth of silver crystals. Bulldog mine, Creede mining district, Colorado. Raines, Ed; Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum

Quartz (variety amethyst)

Quartz (variety amethyst)

Quartz, variety amethyst from the Amethyst vein, Creede mining district, Colorado, forming a vug in amethyst vein material. Raines, Ed. Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum

Sphalerite crystals with galena, amethyst and hematite

Sphalerite with galena, quartz variety amethyst, and minor hematite

Specimen, Commodore Mine, Amethyst vein system, Creede mining district, Colorado. Raines, Ed. Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum.

Cerussite

Cerussite

Intergrowth of white cyclically twinned crystals, Bulldog Mine, Bulldog vein, Creede mining district, Colorado. Raines, Ed. Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum.

Silver minerals in petrified wood

Silver minerals in petrified wood

Petrified wood found in the Monkeymeyer standstone unit of the Creede formation, with sufficient mineralization to be ore. Monkeymeyer Mine, Creede mining district, Colorado. Raines, Ed. Colorado School of Mines, Geology Museum.

More on Creede

The Beginning of Creede

Following several relatively insignificant discoveries in the area, Nicholas C. Creede (real name‑William Harvey) located the Holy Moses Mine on East Willow Creek in 1889. Prominent Denver banker, mining-magnate, and railroad-man David Moffat financed successful exploration efforts that resulted in several productive claims being staked, and personally financed a spur rail line into Creede. This assured a steady stream of prospectors, entrepreneurs, business men and women, along with a wide assortment of the ner-do-wells that joined each new mining boom town. And Creede BOOMED. Loudly. The stories of the boom are among the state’s most colorful.

Mineral Deposits

The Creede District's mineral deposits are tied directly to the geology of the San Juan Mountains. The precious metal bearing veins are located along a major fault system formed during the collapse of a volcano in what must have been a spectacular fireworks show and just one of a series of massive volcanic eruptions nested in the huge LaGarita Volcanic Caldera, one of the largest such features known.

The CSM Geology Museum is home to several collections of specimens from Creede’s deposits. (Courtesy, Ed Raines, Mines Geology Museum, 2018.)

Map of the Creede District